Quick Tip: Navigating World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942

This could also be filed under: When in Doubt, Read the Instructions.

While I don’t use them all that much, I’ve always found the World War II Draft Registration Cards (freely accessible on FamilySearch or through a subscription on Ancestry) to be an interesting collection. They come from the “Old Man’s Draft” — that is, the registration of American men who were between 45 and 64-years old in 1942.

Quick Tip: Tombstone Photographs

Have you wanted to visit an ancestor’s place of burial, but you can’t make it to Fayette County? Or maybe you’re local and you just don’t want to go out in the cold? (Can’t blame you.)

Check out the Fayette County Genealogy Project. Apart from a unique assortment of records and resources — including a bibliography of Fayette County-related books — the group maintains a terrific collection of local headstone photos. I’ve turned to this part of the site countless times in the course of my research. It’s just that great!

Many of the photos are already indexed by surname. If you don’t find the stone you’re looking for, make sure to check the list of photographed cemeteries and the batch of photos not yet indexed.

Quick Tip: Town Histories

When researching the history of a particular town, check what the local media had to say on the anniversary of its founding. Newspapers often print special editions at these times that contain a wealth of historical information.

Papers printed on a town’s centennial or bicentennial are a good place to start, but don’t discount the lesser anniversaries — the 50th, the 75th, or even the odd 220th. You might even check for special editions printed by a newspaper on its own anniversary.