This Week In History: Drink to Your Health

The last month of 1922 was a rough one for Fayette County’s taverns. Though the National Prohibition Act (or “Volstead law”) was put in place nearly three years earlier, local speakeasies still offered a setting for “many Saturday night frolics and joyous pleasure parties,” as an article in the Daily News Standard called them. That came to an end for a few saloons on December 2, 1922, when court action forced them to close.

Book of the Month: A History of the Medical Profession of Fayette County

This month I’m starting something new in the Pennsylvania Room: a Book of the Month display. As many of our visitors are from out of the area and only have time to do specific genealogical research, they usually don’t have a chance to crack open one of our local history books. Given the variety and quality of our collection, I think that’s a real shame.

So, each month I want to select a great PA Room resource that isn’t getting enough attention. For February, that book is Jacob Sidwell Hackney’s A History of the Medical Profession of Fayette County.

“I predict . . . that in the next few years a medical man of Uniontown will be able to look through and through the human body and discover any irregularity or abnormality, and with other discoveries in therapeutics and surgical appliances brought into use, will be able to right it so far as human power can right a physical wrong.

Then in these halcyon days, and they are coming — we shall only die because ‘All men are Mortal.'”

– H.R. Stout, Fayette County physician

Source: “A Century of Medicine.” Daily News Standard [Uniontown, PA] 4 July 1896: 9.