The Marquis de Lafayette’s Trip to Fayette County

This article was researched and written by PA Room volunteer Paul Davis. Thanks to Paul for contributing!

The Marquis de Lafayette became one of the most influential figures in the history of the Western World. He was known as “The Hero of Two Worlds” because of his actions in the American Revolution and his involvement in the French government, but also as “the most hated man in Europe” because of his ideals and actions during the French Revolution.[i]

The “Five Horsemen” in the Maroon Tornado: Uniontown High School’s 1925 Men’s Basketball Team

This article was researched and written by PA Room volunteer Paul Davis. Thanks to Paul for contributing!

Fayette County has always had a rich sports history. If one were to visit the Fayette County Sports Hall of Fame located here in the Uniontown Library they would learn about the varied accomplishments by many talented men and women. Basketball, in particular, has been a powerhouse sport in the area.

The Wreck of the Duquesne Limited

If you live in Fayette County, you likely heard about the railroad cars that derailed behind the courthouse last week. Happily, no one was injured and no hazardous materials were spilled. There were no disruptions at the library, though we did listen to the steady thrumming of an engine for a few days while part of the train idled nearby.

I often come across railroad and trolley accidents while working with the PA Room’s obituary index. Still, the deaths I see were usually caused by passenger error — a person attempted to hop onto a moving train and lost their grip, for instance, or they got hit while walking the tracks.

There is one local railroad catastrophe that has clung to my memory, however: the wreck of the Duquesne Limited.

The Mining Strike of July 1933

Like many of our patrons, we received mail from some distant locales this holiday season. One package arrived from the Museum of South Texas History, whose curator sent us two pictures to add to our collection.

The images date back to 1933 and depict National Guard troops stationed in Brownsville during the coal strikes. Both were stamped for distribution through the Central Press Association and arrived with suggested captions taped to the back.

Judging (Year)Books by Their Covers

Ah, the most mundane of library tasks: “reading the shelves,” or going book by book and putting everything in order. A few weeks ago, after reading the general history and genealogy shelves in the room — yes, all of them — I decided that it was time to sort through our yearbooks.

The collection was reorganized last fall. At the time I was mostly concerned with updating the inventory and moving the more delicate volumes to the safety of the Rare Book Room. Now I could pay more attention to the design of the books, and when I did, I began to notice some patterns.